A Day Late . . .


Arizona

Tonto NF

Surveying the Thumb, Part 1

October 17–21

Must commit to full session

Beyond a few surveys conducted by FS archaeologists, no formal research has been conducted in the long-overlooked projection of the Tonto NF known as the Thumb. What little is known suggests a prehistoric cultural frontier with ties to the Hohokam, Anchan, Mogollon, Anasazi (Ancestral Puebloan), and later Salado cultures. Historically, the area was home to the Apache Peaks band of the San Carlos Western Apache. Later, Euroamerican mining and ranching left their marks. The initial focus for this multiyear survey will be to delineate the boundary of the historic silver mining town of McMillenville, which was occupied from 1876 to 1882. We hope to locate Pat Shanley’s store where the town’s residents held off an 1882 attack by a band of Apache renegades from the San Carlos Reservation who were ultimately cornered and defeated at the Battle of Big Dry Wash. Volunteers will assist FS archaeologists in locating and recording structures and features at McMillenville, in preparation for more detailed mapping and documentation at a later date.

Number of openings: 8

Special skills: Must be able to hike over moderate to rough terrain. Previous archaeological survey and metal detecting experience helpful, but not required. Please bring your own metal detector if you have one and indicate on your application if you will do so.

Minimum age: 12 years old; under 18 with a responsible adult

Facilities: Primitive camping near project area; FS Jones Water Campground ~2 miles from project area with a pit toilet but no water; Globe is a full-service community with numerous motels, stores, and restaurants

Nearest town: Globe, 20 miles

Applications due: August 15


Tonto NF

Sierra Ancha Cliff Dwellings Monitoring Program

October 2005–May 2006, Thursdays through Mondays with Tuesdays and Wednesdays off

Must commit to 10 days (2 sessions); may participate in more

The Sierra Ancha cliff dwellings are located in the Sierra Ancha Wilderness. Built on ledges, in crevices, and under overhangs within the precipitous canyons flanking Cherry Creek, these impressive dwellings were constructed during the late A.D. 1280s and abandoned before 1350. Their condition is deteriorating, and preservation has become even more important because of increased visitation. While increased public interest demonstrates the need to preserve the structures for interpretation and conservation education, it also threatens the fragile resources.

Volunteers are needed to greet the public at the informal trailhead, answer questions about the cliff dwellings, impart trail and site etiquette aimed at minimizing damage to the dwellings, and monitor visitation to the main cliff dwellings. FS district and forest staff will provide volunteers with information about the site and how visitors should treat the resources.

Access to the cliff dwellings is by foot only over unmarked trails. The trailhead, where volunteers will camp and greet the public, is a 2–3 hour hike from the cliff dwellings. Volunteers will hike to the dwellings at least once a week to monitor their condition.

Number of openings: One person or a couple needed during each session; multiple volunteers needed to fill the schedule

Special skills: Applicants should be experienced winter primitive campers, independent, self-reliant, interested in prehistory, and able and willing to communicate with the public. Must be in good physical condition and able to hike from the trailhead into the cliff dwellings at least once a week. The hike is a 2–3 hour climb of from 1,500 to 2,500 feet over unsigned trails and old mining roads.

Must have own 4-wheel-drive vehicle.

Minimum age: 21 years old

Facilities: There are no developed facilities in the vicinity of the cliff dwellings; primitive camping near the trailhead (no amenities) that accesses the most frequented cliff dwellings; trailhead accessed by Forest Road 203.

Nearest town: Globe, ~60 miles

Applications due: Contact the Clearinghouse


Tonto NF

A-Cross Monitoring Program

October 1, 2005-May 15, 2006 (including weekends)

Must commit to 28 days

The A-Cross Administrative Site was originally constructed as a ranger station by the CCC in 1934-1935. Located at an elevation of 2900 feet in upper Sonoran Desertscrub, it served as the winter residence for the district ranger 5 months out of the year with the summer residence located at Reynolds Creek in the higher and cooler Sierra Ancha to the north. It served in this capacity until August 1946. Eventually reduced to an administrative site, it was used on a seasonal basis for fire crews into the early 1990's after which it fell into neglect. Today the site consists of a residence and a much modified barn/garage with a few small ancillary features and rough landscaping. The residence is currently undergoing renovation in preparation for its use as a recreation cabin rental. During this process the site is in need of a caretaker who will also do some site maintenance (light carpentry and groundskeeping) assisting the district personnel and the forest heritage staff in the restoration and development of the site.

Number of openings: One person or a couple needed during each session; multiple volunteers will be needed to fill out the schedules. Selection will be based on both qualifications and length of availability. Those committing to multiple sessions will have priority.

Special skills: Applicants should be independent, self-reliant, and comfortable with camping in a semi-remote area. Volunteers will have limited contact with the public but will provide information on the A-Cross Administrative Site to interested persons. They will not serve as tour guides but rather as care takers. Basic carpentry skills would be useful but are not required.

Minimum age: 21 years old

Facilities: Except for the last mile the site is accessible by paved road. Volunteers will camp on-site. A self-contained RV, camper, or trailer is preferred. Dumping facilities are available at Grapevine on the south shore of Lake Roosevelt ~18 miles. On-site water will have to be boiled or otherwise treated prior to consumption. No electricity or toilet facilities available. The nearest full service town is Globe. Limited services are available at nearby Rock House Store and Roosevelt Lake Estates/Spring Creek Store.

Nearest towns: Globe, ~30 miles; Rock House Store, ~6 miles; Roosevelt Lake Estates/Spring Creek Store, ~15 miles

Applications due: Ongoing


Tonto NF

Historic Pinal Monitoring Program

October 1, 2005-May 15, 2006 (including weekends)

Must commit 28 days

Pinal, the mill town for the famous Silver King Mine, began processing the rich ore from the mine during the summer of 1877. By the early 1880s, Pinal boasted dozens of homes and businesses, a bank, and newspaper, with a bright future predicted for the booming town. However, in 1888, the mineral began to play out at the Silver King Mine, resulting in the first closure of the mine and the beginning of the end for Pinal. The town was abandoned by the 1890s, falling into decay, building materials being scavenged for the nearby developing town that would later be named Superior. Today, the remnants of Pinal consists of the foundations of the 40 stamp mill, homes, and businesses, along with historic artifacts scattered over the town area. Pinal has been the focus of a long term, on-going PIT project recording the town structures and features. Increased public visitation, unpermitted camping, paint balling, and illegal artifact hunting, have damaged and threatens to destroy this fragile, non-renewable resource. To better manage the historic town of Pinal, the Globe Ranger District and the Forest Heritage Program are initiating the first phase of the development and interpretation of the site. As part of the first phase of this program, volunteers will be used to greet the public, answer questions concerning Pinal, the nearby Pinal Cemetery, and Silver King. Volunteers will be given instruction by FS staff to familiarize them with site etiquette and the historic properties.

Number of openings: One person or a couple needed during each session; multiple volunteers will be needed to fill out the schedules. Selection will be based on both qualifications and length of availability. Volunteers committing to longer time periods will be given preference.

Special skills: Applicants should be independent, self-reliant, interested in the old west and mining history, be able to communicate with the public, and comfortable with camping. Volunteers will provide information on Pinal and the surrounding area sites and are not expected to serve as tour guides but rather as care takers. Should be in good physical shape and, if necessary, hike to the Pinal Cemetery located approximately 1 mile north of Pinal. The cemetery can also be reached by high clearance vehicle. Must have own four-wheel drive or high clearance two-wheel drive truck to access the area.

Minimum Age: 21 years old

Facilities: Volunteers will camp in an on-site designated area. Self-contained camper or trailer is preferred with dumping facilities available in Superior, located less than 3 miles to the west along US Hwy 60. Limited shopping and other amenities available in Superior.

Nearest towns: Apache Junction/Phoenix Metro area, ~25 miles; Globe, ~24 miles

Applications due: Ongoing


Shawnee NF

CLOSED Going Crazy for the FS: A Centennial Anniversary Crazy Quilt

IL-2
March 29–31

Must commit to 1 day

We are going a little crazy celebrating the FS 100th anniversary! We want to make a crazy quilt to help us remember the first 100 years of the FS and to serve as an inspiration for the next 100.

Crazy quilts were very popular between 1890 and 1910, important years in the FS’s development. During this time period, the nation’s middle class was growing by leaps and bounds and so was their recreational use of America’s NFs. Folks who had never had the leisure time to travel now had the opportunity to tour the country and visit some of the nation’s natural and cultural wonders. Crazy quilts also illustrate women’s changing roles in society during this same period of time. Women had more leisure time away from meal preparation, child rearing, and other traditional family obligations to create these domestic works of art.
To make our unique crazy quilt, we will be using rich velvets and satins in a variety of colors, including both floral prints and solids. Photographs and published quotes of persons important to the beginning of the FS, such as Theodore Roosevelt and Gifford Pinchot, will be printed directly on the fabric. To complete the quilt, we will also embroider and print trees, landscapes, plants, and wildlife, as well as photographs of spectacular scenery and turn-of-the-century recreation users. These are just a few suggestions for the quilt; the photographs and designs to be included are limitless. Bring your sewing machine and join us in sewing up a permanent reminder of the first 100 years of our country’s national forests.

Number of openings: 15

Minimum age: Under 18 with a responsible adult

Facilities: Motels in Murphysboro; free camping at Johnson Creek Campground, 5 miles west of Murphysboro

Nearest town: Project in Murphysboro

Applications due: December 15


A Patchwork of Partnerships

IL-3
April 27–29

Must commit to 1 day

Geography has made us neighbors. History has made us friends. Economics has made us partners.
—John F. Kennedy, 1961

In 2005, we will be celebrating the 100th anniversary of the founding of the FS. With that thought in mind and inspired by JFK’s quotation, we would like to celebrate our partners and the projects that could not have been completed without their help. Geography, history, and economics all have worked together to bring about some very successful partnerships in southern Illinois. We would like to celebrate and remember these partners and projects on a colorful quilt that will reflect the diversity and color of the partnerships we have enjoyed over the last 60 years.

This quilt will highlight our heritage partnerships, in which many of you have participated over the years, including PIT; Southern Illinois University archaeological field schools; Camp “I, too, am America,” our archaeology day camp held annually at Miller Grove; and let’s not forget Lewis and Clark. But we will also be including partnerships related to the natural history of the Shawnee NF, such as Inahgeh, our Mississippi River wetland restoration partnership project (Inahgeh means “wilderness” and was the name for southern Illinois used by the Cherokee during the long walk on the Trail of Tears), and our partnerships with the Nature Conservancy and Illinois State Department of Natural Resources that help us preserve our natural areas that are remnants of long-gone landscapes. More-recent partnerships include trailriders who have pitched in to help to maintain the trails on the Shawnee NF. As you can see, we have many partners to celebrate, and we hope you will bring your sewing machine and come make a new partnership that will last for decades.

Number of openings: 15

Minimum age: Under 18 with a responsible adult

Facilities: Motels in Murphysboro; free camping at Johnson Creek Campground, 5 miles west of Murphysboro

Nearest town: Project in Murphysboro

Applications due: February 15


Montana

Lolo NF

CLOSED Ninemile Remount Depot Roofing Project

May 22–May 28 (including weekends) Must commit to full session

Volunteers will work with FS preservation professionals installing a wood-shingle roof on one of the residences at the historic Ninemile Remount Depot. The Remount Depot, listed in the NRHP, was established in 1930 by the FS. Its purpose was to train mules and packers to haul supplies to firefighters in the backcountry of the NFs in the northern Rockies from 1930 until 1954. Ninemile was also the first home of the FS Smokejumpers in 1940 and 1941. Today the facility serves as the Ninemile Ranger Station of the Lolo NF and the Ninemile Wildlands Training Center. At the training center, courses are offered to FS employees as well as to the public in backcountry skills such as horse and mule packing, Dutch oven cooking, cross-cut saw use, and historic preservation.

PIT volunteers will learn the correct application of wood shingles and the techniques for grading cedar shakes and shingles. A master carpenter from the Northern Region Historic Preservation team will teach this formal hands-on training in wood-shingle and wood-shake-roof replacement for historical-period and modern buildings. Volunteers will learn skills in material selection, ground staging (scaffolding), roof staging (toe boards), use of specialty roofing tools, the process of old roof removal, and technique applications for a new roof. These applications consist of the proper shingle exposure, single and double coursing, stack joints, fasteners, and flashing. We will spend the majority of the week on the roof. Those afraid of heights should not apply! Throughout the project and hands-on training, it will be impossible not to also absorb lots of information (and opinions) on the principles and philosophy of historic preservation.

Number of openings: 10

Special skills: Must be comfortable working on scaffolding and roofs; carpentry, shingling, and historic preservation skills helpful but not required

Minimum age: 18 years old

Facilities: Camping near work site; Showers available in FS facilities; FS will provide wall tents and cots if necessary; volunteers responsible for own sleeping bag and personal gear; small trailers or motor homes OK, but there are no hookups; FS will provide all meals

Nearest towns: Project in Huson; Alberton, 5 miles; Missoula, 20 miles

Applications due: Contact the Clearinghouse


Beaverhead-Deerlodge NF

Canyon Creek Charcoal Kilns Restoration

Project Dates: August 22-29 (including weekends)

Time Commitment: Must commit to 3days

Description: Work with FS archaeologists and historic preservation specialists to restore the historic Canyon Creek Charcoal Kilns, a site listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The brick beehive-shaped charcoal kilns were constructed in 1881 and were used to produce charcoal for the blast furnaces of the Hecla Consolidated Mining Company's silver and lead smelter at Glendale, MT. Glendale is now a ghost town near the kilns. Volunteers will help repoint loose bricks, and re-white wash three of the 22 kilns on the site to restore them to their 1880s condition. The kilns are scheduled for a major interpretive development project next year, with a deveoped parking area, picnic facilities and interpretive signing. This project is a critical first step in the planned interpretive development.

World class trout fishing waters are nearby. Volunteers could combine the kilns project with a tour of many Lewis and Clark Expedition sites in southwestern Montana during this Bicentennial year.

Number of openings: 10

Special skills: Skill with masonry work helpful but not required

Minimum age: 18 years old

Facilities: Primitive camping at the kilns site; motels may be available in Melrose. Volunteers are urged to check for motel availability in Melrose since it is a major destination for fly fishermen during the summer months.

Nearest towns: Melrose, 10 miles; Dillon, 20 miles; Butte, 50 miles

Applications due: ASAP


Nevada

Humboldt-Toiyabe NF

CLOSED Fort Ruby Excavations

August 1–5

Must commit to full session

Ruby Valley in northeastern Nevada was considered inhospitable, and rather than be sent there, soldiers offered to forfeit their pay to cover the cost of moving them to the Civil War battlefront in the east instead. Their offer was not accepted. In 1862, they built Fort Ruby at the southern end of Ruby Valley, to protect overland routes in this part of Nevada. The fort was abandoned in 1869, and all buildings were sold to ranchers who moved them off-site. From the 1890s to 2002, the land was privately owned.

The Treaty of Ruby Valley was signed at Fort Ruby. This treaty was important to emigrant travelers and the Western Shoshone. It stipulated that the Shoshone would cease hostilities along the emigrant trails and the mail and telegraph lines. In return, they would be granted reservation lands, be paid a monetary sum for subsistence, and compensated for loss of game.

Fort Ruby has suffered from neglect, vandalism, and fire, but there is still the potential to uncover pieces of the past that may provide information concerning life at the fort. With archaeologists from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, we will attempt to uncover building foundations and artifacts associated with the enlisted men and officers.

Number of openings: 20

Special skills: Drawing skills helpful but not required

Minimum age: 18 years old

Facilities: Fee camping at nearby Ruby Valley campground; free dispersed camping closer to the fort; volunteers responsible for own food and camping gear; small convenience store ~20 miles north of project area

Nearest towns: Project in Shantytown; Elko, 63 miles; Ely 80 miles; Wells, 90 miles

Applications due: June 15


Humboldt-Toiyabe NF

Closed Spring City Historic Townsite Recordation

June 13–17

Must commit to full session

The mining community of Spring City began developing after 1868 when Charles Siskron found silver in the area. The town quickly grew to a population of 300 individuals. The town and the silver strike never reached the size of other Nevada gold mining towns, however, Spring City grew to have a reputation as a town that knew how to celebrate. During the height of its existence it boasted seven saloons, a brewery, two restaurants, two public halls for celebration, and two baseball teams. The local Paradise Reporter reported balls that lasted until 4 a.m., complete with midnight dinner supplied by local “gourmet” restaurants and musicians who played the night away.

Although most of the walls and roofs are gone, the site is an archaeological treasure trove of information. The broken artifacts left behind provide clues from which archaeologists can learn about the people who inhabited this small community. The townsite’s features and artifacts have never been fully recorded and are gradually deteriorating. Preliminary investigations have revealed approximately 125 structural features. During this project we continue with our second season of recording structures and their associated artifacts in order to get a better understanding of this community.

Number of openings: 10

Special skills: Drawing skills helpful but not required

Minimum age: 18 years old

Facilities: Tent camping at nearby ranger station, toilets and showers available; RV park with electrical and water hookups in Paradise Valley; B&B nearby, full services in Winnemucca; volunteers responsible for own meals. Access to Spring City is along a rocky, narrow road; FS will provide transportation to the site

Nearest towns: Paradise Valley, 11 miles; Winnemucca, 40 miles

Applications due: April 15


VA

A team of researchers needs your help excavating a site on private land in Caroline County Virginia just east of the Rappahannock River. Cultural Resources Inc. of Fredericksburg, Virginia, is excavating a late 17th–18 th -century domestic site that is very exciting and informative on what life was like during Colonial times in Caroline County. They need as many enthusiastic volunteers as possible from July 25 through August 10 (ending date pending). For information please contact Kerry K. Schamel at (540) 370-1973 or kschamel@culturalresources.net .


WA

Colville NF

CLOSED Top it Off: Shaking Uptagrafft Homestead

Project Dates: August 15–19

Time Commitment: Must commit to full session

Description: Uptagrafft Homestead was built in the early 1900s and partially restored in 1976. Volunteers during previous PIT projects have replaced sill logs and other rotted-out log courses. It is now time to put a roof on the house. Volunteers will assist in installing a new cedar-shake roof, and may be using traditional tools such as mallet and froe.

Number of openings: 6

Special skills: Must be comfortable working at heights in excess of 10 feet; experience with shake-roof installation helpful but not required

Minimum age: 18 years old

Facilities: Camping at the Batey-Bould ORV trailhead campground, pit toilet, potable water, fire pits; solar showers will be available; motels in Usk, Cusick, and Newport.

Nearest Towns: Cusick, 3 miles; Usk, 5 miles; Newport, 18 miles

Applications due: June 15

 


Colville NF

CLOSED Put a Lid on It: Shaking Gypsy-Copper Powderhouse

Project Dates: September 12–16

Time Commitment: Must commit to full session

Description: The Gypsy-Copper Mine Powderhouse dates from the 1890s and is one of the few remaining mining-related structures on the Forest. Sill logs for the Powderhouse were replaced in 2004, and now the building awaits a new roof to finish restoration.. Volunteers will install a cedar-shake roof. We will use traditional tools, include mallet and froe, to make some of the cap shakes.

Number of openings: 4

Special skills: Must be comfortable with working at heights above 10 feet; experience with installing shake roofing helpful but not required

Minimum age: 18 years old

Facilities: Camping at the Sullivan Lake Campground, pit toilets, potable water, fire pits; commercial lodging in Metaline Falls and Ione.

Nearest towns: Metaline Falls, 8 miles; Ione, 18 miles

Applications due: June 15

 

 

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